Friday Favorite Quote

A few months ago, a reader pointed me to a fabulous book called “Crossroads: The Quest for Contemporary Rites of Passage.” Based on the title alone, I knew I had to buy it immediately, and it’s since been a source of inspiration and guidance. As we move into the weekend which invites a slower pace and an opportunity to drop down into yourself, I’d like to share a few pages of the book with you for today’s quote. It’s from an essay by Malidoma Some called “Ritual, the Sacred, and Community.”

“I believe that one of the differences between the modern industrial world and the indigenous world has mostly to do with speed – and not with whether one world needs to have ritual and the other doesn’t. Speed takes toll on our attention by weakening our vigilance. By doing so it endangers the person in speed. On … Click here to continue reading...

Friday Favorite Quote

“I was learning what every spiritual guide and clergy knows, that at transitional times of life, marked by life passages and important holidays, people come out of their shells for more light… And on a grander scale, at the universal life junctures such as marriage, birth, and death people often express willingness to deepen their lives in ways that may have never interested them before. This is so because at these transitional times our normal defenses are lifted and we are shown a more expanded way of being.”

– Rabbi Tirzah Firestone, With Roots In Heaven, pp. 280-281

Bookmark on Delicious Digg this post Recommend on Facebook share via Reddit Share with Stumblers Tweet about it Subscribe to the comments on this post Bookmark in BrowserClick here to continue reading...

Friday Quote: "The Way of Transition: Embracing Life's Most Difficult Moments"

While Arnold van Gennep introduced the term “rite of passage” to the West in 1960 through his book Rites of Passage, William Bridges brought the three-stage roadmap of transitions to mainstream culture with his book, Transitions: Making Sense of Life’s Changes, in 1980. If you’re interested about deepening your understanding of transitions, both books are must-reads. Today’s quotes come from Bridges’ more recent book, The Way of Transition: Embracing Life’s Most Difficult Moments (2001), in which he chronicles his wife’s dying process and his own parallel transition. Here are a few of my favorite passages (but really the entire book should be read because nearly every page contains gems):

“After I began working with people in transition, I found that ending and losses are the commonest first sign that people are in transition. These endings tend to be signaled by one of several experiences:

* a sudden and … Click here to continue reading...

Friday Quote: The Importance of Honoring Transitions

One of the questions that Heather asked when she interviewed me for her wonderful Circle of Stones series was “What can we do globally to create a world that honors the transitions that we all go through, and that have to be recognized in order to create a more peaceful world?” I was humbled that she would ask me a question with such far-reaching ramifications, and I sat with it a long time before I answered. I had to ask myself, as I’ve asked many times before, “Does any of this matter? When there’s an oil spill in our oceans that’s killing and injuring hundreds of creatures each day, when innocent people are in detainment camps and opposing tribes are at war, when the planet is suffering from the consequences of our irresponsible choices and actions, does my work on transitions in my tiny corner of the world make a … Click here to continue reading...

Friday Quote

“Rest is not idleness, and to lie sometimes on the grass, under the trees on a summer’s day, listening to the murmur of the water, or watching the clouds float across the sky, is by no means a waste of time.” – Sir John Lubbock

Central to the work of Conscious Transitions is being able to slow down enough to feel your feelings. For whether we’re getting married or moving, pregnant or entering empty nest, our culture encourages us at every turn to move as quickly as possible and fill every available time slot with things to do. When we move quickly and distract with the items on our to-do lists, we avoid feeling our feelings. But eventually the wedding will be over, the baby will be born, you’ll be settled into the new house, and the feelings that you refused to feel will come crashing down on you. So … Click here to continue reading...