Being in Silence

We live in a very loud world. The industrial revolution shattered the silence and rhythmic sounds of the natural world and the technological revolution has escalated noise to new heights. It seems that most people can hardly last three minutes without grabbing some electronic device that breaks the silence and infuses it with a cacophony of unnatural sound. Silence is quickly becoming a lost art, and it may be irretrievably lost if we don’t intentionally protect it.

The constant soundtrack of machinery and gadgets dovetails perfectly with the extrovert ideal that informs our culture. We hold talking in very high regard. We value babies who are bubbly and chatty with strangers over those who prefer the quiet spaces of home. We place a high premium on the verbal aspects of intelligence (which is why girls tend to perform better in school). The boisterous, football-playing, party-going teenage guy will attract more … Click here to continue reading...

A Walk Alone

I just returned from a walk by myself. It’s rare that I’m alone these days; between my kids, my husband, and work, I’m constantly in contact with someone. But the day felt long and when my husband wrapped up his work, I told him I needed to get outside and walk alone. He took the boys into their room and I grabbed my cell phone and left.

My first instinct was to call someone. But I denied it, then laughed at myself; here I am, craving time alone, and I almost broke my silence to call a friend. Within moments, I could feel the benefits of silence and solitude entering me. I could hear my breath. I noticed the Rocky Mountains jutting up behind the silouette of winter trees and houses. I reveled in the sunlit puffy clouds painting the sky. All of this would have been lost had I … Click here to continue reading...